Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Backpacking to Round, Sand, & Fish Lakes, Uintas

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Backpacking to Round, Sand, & Fish Lakes, Uintas
Round, Sand, and Fish Lakes are part of the upper Weber River drainage on the Western end of the Uinta Mountains. The trail steeply follows the Dry Fork stream and canyon, as it makes it way to the three lakes. Camping and fishing are plentiful here. Round Lake is actually home to three species of fish (somewhat unheard of  in the Uintas, as there are typically only two species in the lakes). There are Grayling, Brook, and Cutthroat Trout. Further ahead is Fish Lake, which can vary in depth by 19 feet, depending on the snow year and dam levels. Plenty of day hiking options are available too, as most day hikers try to reach the ridge for better views. This route is kid and dog friendly!

Friday, August 10, 2018

The Best Day Hikes in the Uintas

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The Best Day Hikes in the Uintas
The High Uintas Wilderness offers some of the best day hiking near Salt Lake City. It provides for a fun, quick getaway that you can do in one day. If you have time, I highly recommend backpacking this mountain range as well. The Uintas are the only mountain range in the lower 48 states that run East to West. The Uinta Mountains extend for 100 miles across Northeast Utah, and a small part of Northwest Colorado, bordered by the Wasatch Mountains to the West. The Uintas contain an unusual amount of land above tree line, and has over 2,000 lakes! The most visited area of the Uintas are along the Mirror Lake Highway, which offers the highest paved road in Utah, as well as plenty of trailheads, camping, fishing, and climbing areas. Check out my list of the 
BEST Day Hikes in the Uintas!

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Backpacking to Allsop Lake, Uintas

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Backpacking to Allsop Lake, Uintas
Allsop Lake sits on the Northern slope of the High Uintas Wilderness at an elevation of 10, 600 ft. It's 9 miles to the lake, so it makes for a perfect 1 or 2-night backpacking trip. The trail is fairly mellow, only gaining 1,600 ft and has one switchback. Allsop Lake is full of brook and tiger trout, and there are a few day hiking options from the lake as well including Cathedral Peak, Allsop Peak, and Yard Peak. This trail is dog friendly, however be aware that free-range livestock graze along the entire route. Plenty of tent and hammock sites line the lake for a perfect campsite. Keep in mind that the Uintas have regular afternoon thunderstorms, so be prepared for any kind of weather.

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Backpacking to Dead Horse Lake, Uintas

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Backpacking to Dead Horse Lake, Uintas
Dead Horse Lake is in the High Uintas Wilderness, and offers an 11 mile hike through large, open meadows, stunning vistas, and of course, leads you to a turquoise lake. This lake offers a great spot for fishing and day hiking. People hiking the Uinta Highline Trail also pass right by Dead Horse Lake. It's a dog friendly trail, though you'll want to give the sheep herds passing by in the meadows plenty of space. Bring your hammock or tent - there are several nice campsites around the lake and plenty of trees for shade. Be sure to check fire restrictions before heading out.

Friday, July 27, 2018

Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes

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Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes
Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-See Sites and Short Hikes is Laurie J. Schmidt's newest book release - I was so excited to get my hands on a copy! Packed with local tales and history, I was curious as to which hikes I had not yet completed. As most Utahan's know, southern Utah is home to thousands of miles of arches, slot canyon, natural bridges, hoodoos, and more. Laurie does a great job of pointing out the best of the best - 20 sites and short hikes you can't miss! This book is the perfect option for those just looking to visit Utah for a few days, or even those that have lived in Utah for years, but have not yet explored this territory. Grab your reading glasses, cup of coffee, and check out everything Utah Canyon Country has to offer!
Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes
 The book itself is a decent size - not too large for carrying around in your backpack, yet light enough to take a long on a backpacking trip.
Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes
The book includes easy-to-reach sites that can be accessed by all family members, entertaining tales and history near each location, basic geology descriptions, sidebars that point out special sites along the way, and full-color original photographs taken by Laurie.
Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes
 I love how organized each hike description is. They are all a quick read, yet provide all the necessary info you need to safely reach the destination. Distance, elevation gain, difficult, fees, cautions, and the closest local services are all included per site and hike as well. It's makes planning your time here a breeze. Laurie also offers the best time to see certain locations - for example, it's highly recommended to see Mesa Arch at sunrise!
Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes
 Several "On the Way" locations are pointed out as well. Ever heard of the Behunin Cabin? Neither had I! Adding these special pages were really a plus for me. Often times we drive straight to our destination or trailhead, without ever thinking (or knowing) about these places. Wouldn't it be great to stop at a new place, stretch your legs, and learn some history? Call me a nerd, but I love that stuff!
Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes
All of Laurie's must-see 20 sites and locations are marked on a map toward the beginning of the book as well. This section only shows the Moab, UT area, but other locations include Canyonlands NP, Capitol Reef NP, and the Escalante, UT area.
Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes
Not sure of a certain word? Check the glossary in the back. If you are new to Utah, this will be a huge help in understanding Laurie's descriptions. Currently the book is only available to purchase directly from her website, as well as all the Utah National Park Visitor Centers.

I'm super excited to add Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short Hikes to my library. I think this is a well-written book, with the best sites and trails everyone should visit. Make it a goal to visit all 20! 

As a special offer for reading my book review, get 20% off your order directly from Laurie's website, using the 
DISCOUNT CODE: 
GOAH20
(this discount code is only good until August 12th, 2018)


Book Review - Utah Canyon Country: 20 Must-see Sites and Short HikesLaurie J. Schmidt is a writer and photographer based in Colorado. She has worked as a NASA science writer and editor, developed web content for the Phoenix Mars Mission, and served as editor of several science magazines and publications. Her science and travel writing has been published in regional and national publications, including PopSci.com, NASA’s Earth Observatory, NASA Global Climate Change, National Parks, and Earth magazine. She holds a master’s degree in journalism, with a focus in science communication. Laurie first discovered Utah canyon country in the early 1990s and has spent 25 years hiking and photographing the geology of the Colorado Plateau region.

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Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Hiking to Eccentric Benchmark, Uintah/Dagget County High Point

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Hiking to Eccentric Benchmark, Uintah/Dagget County High Point
Eccentric Benchmark (12,276 ft) is the highest point for both Uintah & Daggest Counties in Utah, making it a popular summit for peak baggers. It's a high, rounded mountain in the Far East Uintas. What it lacks in views from the summit, makes up along the cross country trek with views as far as King's Peak to the West, and the Flaming Gorge to the Northeast. Although there is no official trail leading to the summit, hiking here is actually quite easy. You'll first pass by three man-made lakes (Chepeta, Papoose, & Moccasin), then work up a short, but steep boulder field, before hiking across high-alpine terrain and reaching the peak.

Thursday, July 19, 2018

Hiking the "Wasatch 7" Peaks

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Hiking the "Wasatch 7" Peaks
The "Wasatch 7" Peaks are the seven major peaks that line the Salt Lake Valley. They are all challenging peaks that require a full day of hiking - some with route finding, some with a perfect trail. Most of these peaks also have a lot of elevation gain, and therefore are not for the beginner hiker. Because the Wasatch 7 Peaks are all over 10,000 ft, they are typically only accessible in summer months, when the dirt roads are open, and the trails are free of snow - this only leaves a few months to summit all 7 peaks. Most people take a few years to complete all summits - others have completed them in one summer. No matter how much time you have to dedicate to completing all of them, they surely live up to Utah's motto - "Life Elevated!"

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Hiking to Cascade Mountain

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Hiking to Cascade Peak, Utah, Hiking the Wasatch 7 Peaks, Utah Peak Baggers, Wasatch Peak Baggers
Cascade Mountain (10,908 ft) is the large mountain located directly above Orem, Utah and is one of the "Wasatch 7" Peaks. Not many people hike to summit, as it requires a full day and all routes are difficult. However, for Peak Baggers it's a must. It's crazy how just to the north of Provo Canyon is one of the most popular summits - Mt. Timpanogos. It's also interesting how different the terrain is compared to each other, and how much more difficult Cascade is. 

Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Best Dog Friendly Waterfalls Hikes in Utah

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The Best Dog Friendly Waterfalls Hikes in Utah
Ready to learn about the BEST Dog Friendly Waterfall Hikes in Utah? 
I've complied all of them into one post - no more researching, asking around, or spending hours looking at AllTrails. All of these listed are dog-friendly (off leash) of course, and are separated by location. There are not ranked in any order. Click the link for each hike to learn more, to see all the trail stats (distance, elevation gain, etc), and to view a trail map. Directions are also provided for each hike. 

Download your FREE Dog-Friendly Waterfall Hikes Checklist here - mark each one off as you go, and make it a goal to complete them all! Did I forget a waterfall hike? Please message me on my Facebook page, and I'll add it to this list. Have fun!

Monday, July 9, 2018

Backpacking the Shingle Creek Trail, Uintas

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Backpacking the Shingle Creek Trail, Uintas
The Shingle Creek Trail in the High Uintas is a popular trail for an "early season" trail for hikers and backpackers to follow when the higher elevations haven't thawed out from winter. I have driven past this trail so many times, yet had never done it - until now! I decided to head up for one night with two friends and our destination was South Erickson Lake. East Shingle Creek Lake is more popular, but a little lower in elevation, and seemed to have more mosquitos so we wanted to keep going.

Friday, July 6, 2018

Hiking to Mt. Watson, Uintas

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Hiking to Mt. Watson, Uintas, Hiking with dogs in the Uintas, Hiking with dogs in Utah, Hiking in the Uintas
Mt. Watson (11,521 ft) is located on the East side of the High Uintas Wilderness, and though it is surrounded by several popular trails and lakes, most people do not summit this peak. There is a trail for the first 2 miles, but you're on your own after that to reach the top. That's what makes part of this peak fun - it's a "choose your own path" adventure!

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Backpacking to Kermsuh Lake, Uintas

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Backpacking to Kermsuh Lake, Uintas, Christmas Meadows
Kermsuh Lake is an alpine lake in the High Uintas Wilderness. It sits at an elevation of 10,200 ft, making it the perfect cooler destination while the SLC valley is baking in heat. Kermsuh Lake sits in one of the three basins in Christmas Meadows - Ryder and Amethyst Lake are the other two, more popular lakes. 

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Hiking to Mt. Waas, La Sal Mountains

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Hiking to Mt. Waas, LaSal Mountains, Grand County High Point, Hiking in Utah with Dogs
Mt. Waas (12,331 ft) is the Grand County High Point, and highest peak on the north end of the La Sal Mountains near Moab, Utah. The La Sals can be seen as far away from Green River and parts of Colorado, yet hardly anyone makes the trek to the several summits available, making a great place to seek solitude. The Moab valley can be in the 100s for daily high temperatures in the Summer, yet in the LaSals, it can be at least 20-30F cooler depending on how high you reach. The La Sals area only accessible during summer months when the gates are open, and the roads are dry and clear of snow, typically July - October. Winter of 2017 was extremely dry so we were able to summit late June 2018 with only one patch of snow.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Hiking to Deseret Peak

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Hiking to Deseret Peak, Utah's Ultra Prominence Peaks, Hiking in Utah with Dogs
Deseret Peak (11,031 ft) is one of Utah's Ultra Prominent Peaks, is the tallest mountain in the Stansbury Mountain range, and the Tooele County highpoint. Therefore, this 9 mile loop is popular among peak baggers and those looking for an "easy" summit. This trail gains 3,700 ft in just 4 miles, is dog friendly, and offers amazing views of the surrounding area. 

Monday, June 11, 2018

Hiking to Church Fork Peak, Millcreek Canyon

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Hiking to Church Fork Peak, Milcreek Canyon
Church Fork Peak (8,306 ft) is located along the Millcreek Canyon ridge, in-between Mt. Aire and Grandeur Peak. To get to the summit, you follow the Pipeline Trail, then turn off on the actual Birch Hollow trail, reach the ridge, then bushwhack your away to the false summit and true peak. This trail is very steep, and requires some route finding along the ridge. If you aren't comfortable hiking off trail, bushwhacking, and route finding, this isn't the trail for you.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Hiking to Nobletts Creek, Uintas

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Hiking to Nobletts Creek, Uintas
Noblett's Creek, located in the Southwestern end of the Uinta Mountains, is a good early/pre-season hike when the rest of the high elevation hikes in the Uintas are still covered with snow and mud. Because Noblett's Creek is at an elevation of 7,400 ft it is typically ready to hike by end of May/early June (depending on the snow pack from Winter). This trail is really short at only 2 miles round trip, making it perfect for families and kids.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Hiking to Blind Lake, Boulder Mountain

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Hiking to Blind Lake, Boulder Mountain
Blind Lake is located on Boulder Mountain in Utah - it is the deepest and biggest lake on the mountain at 52 acres and 52 feet deep. Most people come to the lake to fish for trout, but there the trail itself is great for dogs, kids, and families. It's only 1 mile to reach Blind Lake, but you can continue on to Pear & Fish Creek Lake, and the Beaver Dam Reservoir. If you hike to all lakes, the trail will be 6 miles RT. Our pup friend Bear was recovering from hiking the Behunin and Meeks Lake Trail, so I decided to just hang out at Blind Lakes, while my friends continued on. Boulder Mountain has about 60 high-elevation fishable lakes. While may of the lakes are tiny or run as stocked fisheries, trophy-size trout are not uncommon here in Blind Lake.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Hiking the Behunin Trail & Meeks Lake Loop, Boulder Mountain

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Hiking the Behunin Trail & Meeks Lake Loop, Boulder Mountain
The Behunin Trail and Meeks Lake Trail are both located on Boulder Mountain, Utah, and are often done as separate hikes. However, you can combine them into one big loop to really see the East side of Boulder Mountain, and on clear days, all the way to the Henry Mountains. First, you'll hike up to "Boulder Top", the ridge, where you'll cross several open meadows, a stream, and will pass by an old airplane crash. Then you'll make your way over to Pleasant Lake, which offers great trout fishing and refreshing cooler temperatures, since the lake is at an elevation of 10,300 ft. After that, you'll hike over to Meeks Lake, another popular lake, and though it's pretty, doesn't have many fish. At the end of the day, you'll drop down the Meeks Lake Trail, and make your way through more meadows, and end back at your car.

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Hiking to Singletree Falls, Boulder Mountain

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Hiking to Singletree Falls, Boulder Mountain
Singletree Falls is a short, family-friendly hike on Boulder Mountain, Utah. It's conveniently located off the popular HWY 12 in between Torrey and Boulder, UT. Singletree Falls flows from Singletree Creek, overflowing at a 30 ft waterfall.
This trail is only 0.8 miles round-trip, making it a perfect distance for kids, families, and older adults. This trail is also great for the pups, as it is off leash. Wear your water shoes, maybe a swimsuit, and stand under the falls for a refreshing natural shower.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Backpacking the Ashdown Gorge via Rattlesnake Creek

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Backpacking the Ashdown Gorge via Rattlesnake Creek
The Ashdown Gorge is located on the boundary line of Cedar Breaks National Monument, and lies withing the Ashdown Gorge Wilderness near Cedar City, Utah. The trail starts by following the Rattlesnake Creek Trail at 10,500 ft, and eventually drops into the gorge descending a total of 4,100 ft. This route is best done point-to-point, with 1 over night backpacking. You can definitely do this in one day, but to really experience the canyon and take your time, backpacking this trail is perfect.

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Hiking to the Jardine Juniper Tree, Logan Canyon

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Hiking to the Jardine Juniper Tree, Logan Canyon
The Jardine Juniper Tree is location in Logan Canyon, Utah, and is 1,500 years old! It is close to 40 feet tall, and 23.6 ft in circumference. The Jardine Juniper was discovered in 1923 by Maurice Linford, who was a student at Utah State (then called Utah State Agricultural College), and the tree was named after the former US Secretary of Agricultur William Marion Jardine.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Hiking from Heugh's Canyon to Olympus Cove

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Hiking from Heugh's Canyon to Olympus Cove, Bonneville Shoreline Trail, Hiking in Utah with Dogs
 Heugh's Canyon to Olympus Cove follows one of the newest sections of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST). It's a 5 mile point-to-point trail great for dogs and trail runs. There are a few sections with sheer drop offs, and for that reason, I don't recommend little kids. The views along this route offer amazing views of the SLC valley, as well as Mt. Olympus high above to the East. There is only a handful of shady spots and no water source, so you'll definitley want to start early in the morning (or late evening) to beat the heat. There are several nice rocky outcroppings that would be perfect to watch sunset from as well. This route requires a car shuttle - one at each trailhead if you plan to hike this point-to-point. 

Sunday, May 13, 2018

Hiking the Cassidy Trail in Red Canyon

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Hiking the Butch Cassidy Trail, Red Canyon near Bryce Canyon National Park
Red Canyon is located off HWY 12 near Bryce Canyon National Park, which compared to it's famous neighbor, sees half the visitors. And for good reason - there's no national park name attached it, and many people do not realize how many trails are in the canyon. In particular, the Cassidy Trail, is one of the best in the canyon. No fees, dog friendly, shade, and amazing views all located in the Dixie National Forest - does it get any better?

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Hiking Pine Creek (The Box Trail)

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Hiking Pine Creek (The Box Trail) in Escalante, Utah, Hiking in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, Hiking in Utah with Dogs
Pine Creek Canyon is a hidden gem in the Escalante area - a pristine creek, tall canyon walls, half mountain-half desert, no cows, all downhill, plenty of shade, and towering Ponderosa trees. Located in the Box-Death Hollow Wilderness, this canyon is also known as "The Box", which is funny since it's not really a box canyon but steep-walled, open-ended drainage carved by Pine Creek millions of years ago.

Monday, May 7, 2018

Hiking to Bowington Arch

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Bowington Arch Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (GSENM), Hiking with Dogs in Utah
Bowington Arch is located in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (GSENM) near the town of Escalante, UT. It's an easy hike that crosses the Escalante River several times, and therefore it's important to wear water shoes. You will also hike through sandy sections with sage brush and cottonwood trees. Bowington Arch is dog-friendly and (possibly) kid friendly. There are no obstacles of any kind except for one small scramble the the dogs can easily do, and some younger kids might need help with. I say possibly kid friendly since this trail is close to 8 miles round trip, but is completely flat the whole way. Make sure you have a map of the area downloaded on your phone or GPS, as there is no sign for where to turn off for the arch. I highly recommend the Gaia GPS app.

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Backpacking the Escalante River Trail

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Backpacking the Escalante River Trail, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument
The Escalante River Trail is a popular backpacking point-to-point route near the town of Escalante, Utah and within Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (GSENM). The entire length of the Escalante River is 87 miles, but this route allows you to see 15 miles of it overnight one night of backpacking. Much of the way, your path will be the river itself. On a blue sky, warm & sunny day, splashing through the stream along tall Navajo sandstone walls feels amazing. Around every corner is something new and exciting to look at. The Escalante Natural Bridge. An arch. Petroglyphs & pictographs. Ruins. You name it, it has it.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Hiking the Kamas Overlook Trail

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Hiking the Kamas Overlook Trail
The Kamas Overlook Trail is, and as the name implies, is near Kamas, Utah and offers a great view of the valleys nearby. It is a very mellow trail, only gaining 215 ft per mile! You will likely see few people here, but be advised this trail has zero shade. This trail is open to hikers, mountain bikers, horseback riders, and more and therefore the trail can get rutted out in early Spring. The best seasons to hike this trail are late Spring when the trail dries, and Fall after the temperatures have cooled off. Winter is doable, but the trail may be muddy, as its on a south facing hill. Summer could be miserably hot, unless you start really early in the morning.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden

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Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
The Indian Trail, located in Ogden, Utah is a beautiful trail that offers views of Ogden Canyon and surrounding areas. It's best done as a point-to-point route, starting at the Coldwater Canyon TH, and ending at the 22nd Street TH. The hike is really well shaded, and offers a creek for the first mile for the dogs to drink from. Past that, the trails curves around the mountain side, passes an old cabin, several overlooks, and eventually connects to the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST). This hikes is best from April-October, or when the trail is snow-free.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Guest Post: 4 Tips to Make Hiking with Your Partner the BEST!

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Today's Guest Post is brought to you by HikrLife!
4 Tips to Make Hiking with Your Partner the BEST!
Hiking with your significant other, best friend, or just a last minute person can be so great. But it can also be a drag if you don't plan things right or if you don't know what the other person wants to do. Here are some tips to make sure you get the most out of enjoying your hike with your adventure partner!

Monday, April 9, 2018

Hiking Sulphur Creek, Capitol Reef National Park

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Hiking Sulphur Creek, Capitol Reef National Park
Sulphur Creek is located in Capitol Reef National Park and provides a beautiful water hike through a narrow canyon, with subway-like channels, cutting through layered, orange and red sandstone. It's considered the "Subway" or "Narrows" of CRNP, though really it lives up to it's own name. The water is rarely more than ankle deep and there are three waterfalls that you can easily bypass, one forces you to slide down it's 5 foot drop!

Friday, April 6, 2018

Hiking to Hickman Bridge, Capitol Reef National Park

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Hiking to Hickman Bridge, Capitol Reef National Park
Hickman Bridge is one of the most popular trails in Capitol Reef National Park, and the bridge itself is 130 ft across and 125 ft high. The NP provides a brochure, describing 18 numbered points of interest. The trail starts by following the Fremont River, goes up a hillside, which passes the trail split for Navajo Knobs, crosses an open area then drops down into a shallow, rocky canyon. Hickman Bridge has a very impressive setting, with amazing surrounding views. It was named after Joseph Hickman, a local school administrator and Utah legislator who was an early advocate for the CRNP area.
This hike is great for all ages, however dogs are not allowed on this trail.  Many people compare Hickman Bridge to the bridges/arches found at Natural Bridges National Monument.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park

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Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Cassidy Arch is located in Capitol Reef National Park, in the heart of the Waterpocket Fold, a 100-mile monoclinal flexure (simply, a "buckle") in the earth's upper crust. It runs North to South, all the way down to Lake Powell. Along the Fold, rocks have been pushed up and erosion has cut through layers creating deep, narrow canyons and formations. Cassidy Arch, named after Butch Cassidy, 
 is roughly 40 ft across near the top of the arch and the trail provides amazing views of the Grand Wash/Capitol Reef area.

If you only want to hike to the arch, it's 3 miles RT. However, the best way to really get the most bang for your buck, er.. hike, is to hike the Frying Pan Trail past the arch, point-to-point, and connect over to the Hickman Bridge/HWY 24 trail head. Doing this requires a car drop, so you'll need two cars OR, you can try to hitch a ride back to your starting point. Point to point, including Cassidy Arch, is only 5.5 miles. This route provides some of the best views in Capitol Reef National Park. You get to walk along cliff edges, climb on top of rocky area, & see the famous orange, red, and white stripes that make up a large part of Southern Utah.

The trail is best in Spring or Fall, when the temperatures are much cooler. Summer would be miserably hot - there is also very little shade and no water along the way. Even in cooler temps, be prepared with at least 3 liters of water. Dogs are not allowed, of course since its a National Park, and older kids will also enjoy this route.

From the CRNP Visitor Center, drive south on Camp Ground Rd for 3.4 miles. Turn left at the Grand Wash TH sign. Follow this to the end of the road where the trail starts.

Here's a driving map.

Distance: 3 miles RT to Cassidy Arch
5.5 miles point-to-point from the Cassidy Arch TH to the HWY 24/Hickman Bridge TH
Elevation gain: 1,400 ft (point to point)
Time: 2-4 hours
Dog Friendly? No, dogs are not allowed on this trail
Kid Friendly? Yes, but only to Cassidy Arch
Fees/Permits: None

Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Ready to go! We didn't start hiking until noon or so, and it was already hot for Easter weekend.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Start by following Grand Wash.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Keep an eye out for the water and trail sign on the left side of the canyon. This is how you will reach Cassidy Arch, and connect back over to your car via the Frying Pan Trail to HWY 24.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll immediately gain elevation and have amazing views of Grand Wash. 
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
I spy a white van....that's our car way down there!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Looking back, and down to the TH - the trail was really packed.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Hiking along the ridge, with "Fern's Nipple" in the distance.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Cassidy Arch is right next to my head in the distance - you're halfway there!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll reach the trail split - Cassidy Arch is to the left and about another 10 min hike. Stop here first before coming back to this split and connecting to the Frying Pan Trail. You won't see a trail sign for HWY 24 or the Frying Pan Trail until the very end, but this is the right way.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
The trail to Cassidy Arch turns into slick rock. If you haven't noticed yet, there's zero shade on this hike. If you are hiking in hot temps, be sure to start early in the morning to beat the heat.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
We made it! Standing on top of the arch is not scary at all - it's about 20-25 feet wide so there's plenty of room to walk.Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Group selfie!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
One more photo! This arch is really cool but also hard to get pictures since there's so many people. Thankfully we waited a few minutes and people cleared out.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Back at the trail split, stay right to connect over to HWY 24, if you are doing this as a point-to-point hike.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll gain even more elevation, and have amazing views near the top at the highest point along the trail.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
All heads are down...it must mean were are all focused on the trail haha
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
The views from the high point are so pretty! 
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
The trail will then drop in elevation for awhile, before picking right back up.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Orange, red, and white for days!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Cohab Canyon is now in view. You can exit this route, if you parked a car at that TH or keep going to the Hickman Bridge/HWY 24 TH. Both are about the same distance just opposite directions.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll come to the next trail split. It's a little confusing here. The trail kind of splits in a "Y" - to get to HWY 24 make sure to take the trail up and right. Going down and left will take you into Cohab Canyon.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You should hike past the electric poles heading East.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll see the parking lot, and the trail will lead you down to the road.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Walk back to your car along the road. From here you would drive back to get the other car you parked at the Cassidy Arch TH, then drive back here to get the rest of your group. If you are in one car then you'll need to hitch a ride back.


Trail Map




Coming Soon!


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