Monday, June 11, 2018

Hiking to Church Fork Peak, Millcreek Canyon

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking to Church Fork Peak, Milcreek Canyon
Church Fork Peak (8,306 ft) is located along the Millcreek Canyon ridge, in-between Mt. Aire and Grandeur Peak. To get to the summit, you follow the Pipeline Trail, then turn off on the actual Birch Hollow trail, reach the ridge, then bushwhack your away to the false summit and true peak. This trail is very steep, and requires some route finding along the ridge. If you aren't comfortable hiking off trail, bushwhacking, and route finding, this isn't the trail for you.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Hiking to Nobletts Creek, Uintas

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking to Nobletts Creek, Uintas
Noblett's Creek, located in the Southwestern end of the Uinta Mountains, is a good early/pre-season hike when the rest of the high elevation hikes in the Uintas are still covered with snow and mud. Because Noblett's Creek is at an elevation of 7,400 ft it is typically ready to hike by end of May/early June (depending on the snow pack from Winter). This trail is really short at only 2 miles round trip, making it perfect for families and kids.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Hiking to Blind Lake, Boulder Mountain

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking to Blind Lake, Boulder Mountain
Blind Lake is located on Boulder Mountain in Utah - it is the deepest and biggest lake on the mountain at 52 acres and 52 feet deep. Most people come to the lake to fish for trout, but there the trail itself is great for dogs, kids, and families. It's only 1 mile to reach Blind Lake, but you can continue on to Pear & Fish Creek Lake, and the Beaver Dam Reservoir. If you hike to all lakes, the trail will be 6 miles RT. Our pup friend Bear was recovering from hiking the Behunin and Meeks Lake Trail, so I decided to just hang out at Blind Lakes, while my friends continued on. Boulder Mountain has about 60 high-elevation fishable lakes. While may of the lakes are tiny or run as stocked fisheries, trophy-size trout are not uncommon here in Blind Lake.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Hiking the Behunin Trail & Meeks Lake Loop, Boulder Mountain

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking the Behunin Trail & Meeks Lake Loop, Boulder Mountain
The Behunin Trail and Meeks Lake Trail are both located on Boulder Mountain, Utah, and are often done as separate hikes. However, you can combine them into one big loop to really see the East side of Boulder Mountain, and on clear days, all the way to the Henry Mountains. First, you'll hike up to "Boulder Top", the ridge, where you'll cross several open meadows, a stream, and will pass by an old airplane crash. Then you'll make your way over to Pleasant Lake, which offers great trout fishing and refreshing cooler temperatures, since the lake is at an elevation of 10,300 ft. After that, you'll hike over to Meeks Lake, another popular lake, and though it's pretty, doesn't have many fish. At the end of the day, you'll drop down the Meeks Lake Trail, and make your way through more meadows, and end back at your car.

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Hiking to Singletree Falls, Boulder Mountain

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking to Singletree Falls, Boulder Mountain
Singletree Falls is a short, family-friendly hike on Boulder Mountain, Utah. It's conveniently located off the popular HWY 12 in between Torrey and Boulder, UT. Singletree Falls flows from Singletree Creek, overflowing at a 30 ft waterfall.
This trail is only 0.8 miles round-trip, making it a perfect distance for kids, families, and older adults. This trail is also great for the pups, as it is off leash. Wear your water shoes, maybe a swimsuit, and stand under the falls for a refreshing natural shower.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Backpacking the Ashdown Gorge via Rattlesnake Creek

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Backpacking the Ashdown Gorge via Rattlesnake Creek
The Ashdown Gorge is located on the boundary line of Cedar Breaks National Monument, and lies withing the Ashdown Gorge Wilderness near Cedar City, Utah. The trail starts by following the Rattlesnake Creek Trail at 10,500 ft, and eventually drops into the gorge descending a total of 4,100 ft. This route is best done point-to-point, with 1 over night backpacking. You can definitely do this in one day, but to really experience the canyon and take your time, backpacking this trail is perfect.

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Hiking to the Jardine Juniper Tree, Logan Canyon

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking to the Jardine Juniper Tree, Logan Canyon
The Jardine Juniper Tree is location in Logan Canyon, Utah, and is 1,500 years old! It is close to 40 feet tall, and 23.6 ft in circumference. The Jardine Juniper was discovered in 1923 by Maurice Linford, who was a student at Utah State (then called Utah State Agricultural College), and the tree was named after the former US Secretary of Agricultur William Marion Jardine.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Hiking from Heugh's Canyon to Olympus Cove

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking from Heugh's Canyon to Olympus Cove, Bonneville Shoreline Trail, Hiking in Utah with Dogs
 Heugh's Canyon to Olympus Cove follows one of the newest sections of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST). It's a 5 mile point-to-point trail great for dogs and trail runs. There are a few sections with sheer drop offs, and for that reason, I don't recommend little kids. The views along this route offer amazing views of the SLC valley, as well as Mt. Olympus high above to the East. There is only a handful of shady spots and no water source, so you'll definitley want to start early in the morning (or late evening) to beat the heat. There are several nice rocky outcroppings that would be perfect to watch sunset from as well. This route requires a car shuttle - one at each trailhead if you plan to hike this point-to-point. 

Sunday, May 13, 2018

Hiking the Cassidy Trail in Red Canyon

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking the Butch Cassidy Trail, Red Canyon near Bryce Canyon National Park
Red Canyon is located off HWY 12 near Bryce Canyon National Park, which compared to it's famous neighbor, sees half the visitors. And for good reason - there's no national park name attached it, and many people do not realize how many trails are in the canyon. In particular, the Cassidy Trail, is one of the best in the canyon. No fees, dog friendly, shade, and amazing views all located in the Dixie National Forest - does it get any better?

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Hiking Pine Creek (The Box Trail)

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking Pine Creek (The Box Trail) in Escalante, Utah, Hiking in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, Hiking in Utah with Dogs
Pine Creek Canyon is a hidden gem in the Escalante area - a pristine creek, tall canyon walls, half mountain-half desert, no cows, all downhill, plenty of shade, and towering Ponderosa trees. Located in the Box-Death Hollow Wilderness, this canyon is also known as "The Box", which is funny since it's not really a box canyon but steep-walled, open-ended drainage carved by Pine Creek millions of years ago.

Monday, May 7, 2018

Hiking to Bowington Arch

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Bowington Arch Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (GSENM), Hiking with Dogs in Utah
Bowington Arch is located in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (GSENM) near the town of Escalante, UT. It's an easy hike that crosses the Escalante River several times, and therefore it's important to wear water shoes. You will also hike through sandy sections with sage brush and cottonwood trees. Bowington Arch is dog-friendly and (possibly) kid friendly. There are no obstacles of any kind except for one small scramble the the dogs can easily do, and some younger kids might need help with. I say possibly kid friendly since this trail is close to 8 miles round trip, but is completely flat the whole way. Make sure you have a map of the area downloaded on your phone or GPS, as there is no sign for where to turn off for the arch. I highly recommend the Gaia GPS app.

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Backpacking the Escalante River Trail

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Backpacking the Escalante River Trail, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument
The Escalante River Trail is a popular backpacking point-to-point route near the town of Escalante, Utah and within Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (GSENM). The entire length of the Escalante River is 87 miles, but this route allows you to see 15 miles of it overnight one night of backpacking. Much of the way, your path will be the river itself. On a blue sky, warm & sunny day, splashing through the stream along tall Navajo sandstone walls feels amazing. Around every corner is something new and exciting to look at. The Escalante Natural Bridge. An arch. Petroglyphs & pictographs. Ruins. You name it, it has it.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Hiking the Kamas Overlook Trail

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking the Kamas Overlook Trail
The Kamas Overlook Trail is, and as the name implies, is near Kamas, Utah and offers a great view of the valleys nearby. It is a very mellow trail, only gaining 215 ft per mile! You will likely see few people here, but be advised this trail has zero shade. This trail is open to hikers, mountain bikers, horseback riders, and more and therefore the trail can get rutted out in early Spring. The best seasons to hike this trail are late Spring when the trail dries, and Fall after the temperatures have cooled off. Winter is doable, but the trail may be muddy, as its on a south facing hill. Summer could be miserably hot, unless you start really early in the morning.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
The Indian Trail, located in Ogden, Utah is a beautiful trail that offers views of Ogden Canyon and surrounding areas. It's best done as a point-to-point route, starting at the Coldwater Canyon TH, and ending at the 22nd Street TH. The hike is really well shaded, and offers a creek for the first mile for the dogs to drink from. Past that, the trails curves around the mountain side, passes an old cabin, several overlooks, and eventually connects to the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST). This hikes is best from April-October, or when the trail is snow-free.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Guest Post: 4 Tips to Make Hiking with Your Partner the BEST!

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Today's Guest Post is brought to you by HikrLife!
4 Tips to Make Hiking with Your Partner the BEST!
Hiking with your significant other, best friend, or just a last minute person can be so great. But it can also be a drag if you don't plan things right or if you don't know what the other person wants to do. Here are some tips to make sure you get the most out of enjoying your hike with your adventure partner!

Monday, April 9, 2018

Hiking Sulphur Creek, Capitol Reef National Park

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking Sulphur Creek, Capitol Reef National Park
Sulphur Creek is located in Capitol Reef National Park and provides a beautiful water hike through a narrow canyon, with subway-like channels, cutting through layered, orange and red sandstone. It's considered the "Subway" or "Narrows" of CRNP, though really it lives up to it's own name. The water is rarely more than ankle deep and there are three waterfalls that you can easily bypass, one forces you to slide down it's 5 foot drop!

Friday, April 6, 2018

Hiking to Hickman Bridge, Capitol Reef National Park

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking to Hickman Bridge, Capitol Reef National Park
Hickman Bridge is one of the most popular trails in Capitol Reef National Park, and the bridge itself is 130 ft across and 125 ft high. The NP provides a brochure, describing 18 numbered points of interest. The trail starts by following the Fremont River, goes up a hillside, which passes the trail split for Navajo Knobs, crosses an open area then drops down into a shallow, rocky canyon. Hickman Bridge has a very impressive setting, with amazing surrounding views. It was named after Joseph Hickman, a local school administrator and Utah legislator who was an early advocate for the CRNP area.
This hike is great for all ages, however dogs are not allowed on this trail.  Many people compare Hickman Bridge to the bridges/arches found at Natural Bridges National Monument.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Cassidy Arch is located in Capitol Reef National Park, in the heart of the Waterpocket Fold, a 100-mile monoclinal flexure (simply, a "buckle") in the earth's upper crust. It runs North to South, all the way down to Lake Powell. Along the Fold, rocks have been pushed up and erosion has cut through layers creating deep, narrow canyons and formations. Cassidy Arch, named after Butch Cassidy, 
 is roughly 40 ft across near the top of the arch and the trail provides amazing views of the Grand Wash/Capitol Reef area.

If you only want to hike to the arch, it's 3 miles RT. However, the best way to really get the most bang for your buck, er.. hike, is to hike the Frying Pan Trail past the arch, point-to-point, and connect over to the Hickman Bridge/HWY 24 trail head. Doing this requires a car drop, so you'll need two cars OR, you can try to hitch a ride back to your starting point. Point to point, including Cassidy Arch, is only 5.5 miles. This route provides some of the best views in Capitol Reef National Park. You get to walk along cliff edges, climb on top of rocky area, & see the famous orange, red, and white stripes that make up a large part of Southern Utah.

The trail is best in Spring or Fall, when the temperatures are much cooler. Summer would be miserably hot - there is also very little shade and no water along the way. Even in cooler temps, be prepared with at least 3 liters of water. Dogs are not allowed, of course since its a National Park, and older kids will also enjoy this route.

From the CRNP Visitor Center, drive south on Camp Ground Rd for 3.4 miles. Turn left at the Grand Wash TH sign. Follow this to the end of the road where the trail starts.

Here's a driving map.

Distance: 3 miles RT to Cassidy Arch
5.5 miles point-to-point from the Cassidy Arch TH to the HWY 24/Hickman Bridge TH
Elevation gain: 1,400 ft (point to point)
Time: 2-4 hours
Dog Friendly? No, dogs are not allowed on this trail
Kid Friendly? Yes, but only to Cassidy Arch
Fees/Permits: None

Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Ready to go! We didn't start hiking until noon or so, and it was already hot for Easter weekend.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Start by following Grand Wash.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Keep an eye out for the water and trail sign on the left side of the canyon. This is how you will reach Cassidy Arch, and connect back over to your car via the Frying Pan Trail to HWY 24.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll immediately gain elevation and have amazing views of Grand Wash. 
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
I spy a white van....that's our car way down there!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Looking back, and down to the TH - the trail was really packed.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Hiking along the ridge, with "Fern's Nipple" in the distance.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Cassidy Arch is right next to my head in the distance - you're halfway there!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll reach the trail split - Cassidy Arch is to the left and about another 10 min hike. Stop here first before coming back to this split and connecting to the Frying Pan Trail. You won't see a trail sign for HWY 24 or the Frying Pan Trail until the very end, but this is the right way.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
The trail to Cassidy Arch turns into slick rock. If you haven't noticed yet, there's zero shade on this hike. If you are hiking in hot temps, be sure to start early in the morning to beat the heat.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
We made it! Standing on top of the arch is not scary at all - it's about 20-25 feet wide so there's plenty of room to walk.Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Group selfie!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
One more photo! This arch is really cool but also hard to get pictures since there's so many people. Thankfully we waited a few minutes and people cleared out.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Back at the trail split, stay right to connect over to HWY 24, if you are doing this as a point-to-point hike.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll gain even more elevation, and have amazing views near the top at the highest point along the trail.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
All heads are down...it must mean were are all focused on the trail haha
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
The views from the high point are so pretty! 
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
The trail will then drop in elevation for awhile, before picking right back up.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Orange, red, and white for days!
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Cohab Canyon is now in view. You can exit this route, if you parked a car at that TH or keep going to the Hickman Bridge/HWY 24 TH. Both are about the same distance just opposite directions.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll come to the next trail split. It's a little confusing here. The trail kind of splits in a "Y" - to get to HWY 24 make sure to take the trail up and right. Going down and left will take you into Cohab Canyon.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You should hike past the electric poles heading East.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
You'll see the parking lot, and the trail will lead you down to the road.
Hiking to Cassidy Arch & the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park
Walk back to your car along the road. From here you would drive back to get the other car you parked at the Cassidy Arch TH, then drive back here to get the rest of your group. If you are in one car then you'll need to hitch a ride back.


Trail Map




Coming Soon!


Share me on Pinterest!

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Hike the Bayliss Fork Trail, Emigration Canyon

Share this Post Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email This Pin This
Hike the Bayliss Fork Trail, Emigration Canyon
The Bayliss Fork Trail is located in Emigration Canyon, not quite a mile past Ruth's Diner. The trail follows one of the many drainages from the ridge line that connects Mt. Wire over to Lookout Peak. Eventually the trail turns into an old jeep road, and follows the ridge to reach the top. Don't forget to look back as you hike higher in elevation - the best views are when you turn around. On the main ridge/saddle, you can see down into Red Butte Canyon Research Natural Area, and several other local peaks such as Grandview Peak