Monday, April 23, 2018

Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden

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Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
The Indian Trail, located in Ogden, Utah is a beautiful trail that offers views of Ogden Canyon and surrounding areas. It's best done as a point-to-point route, starting at the Coldwater Canyon TH, and ending at the 22nd Street TH. The hike is really well shaded, and offers a creek for the first mile for the dogs to drink from. Past that, the trails curves around the mountain side, passes an old cabin, several overlooks, and eventually connects to the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST). This hikes is best from April-October, or when the trail is snow-free.

To get to the Coldwater Canyon TH, drive East into Ogden Canyon for 2.3 miles, & look for the brown "Indian TH" sign on your right. Pull into the dirt parking lot, which can fit about 12 cars. Overflow parking is across the road. Leave one car here. 
Here is a map from SLC. 

To get to the 22nd Street TH, drive north on HWY-89 until you see 22nd Street, and turn right. Park at the very end of the road. Leave one car here. Here is a map from SLC.

The easiest way to do this is to first leave one car at the 22nd Street TH, then everyone drives over to the Coldwater Canyon TH, and leave the other car there. 

Distance: 4.3 miles point-to-point
Elevation gain: 1,312 ft
Time: 2-3 hours
Dog friendly? Yes, off leash
Kid friendly? No due to length and steepness
Fees/permits? None

Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 The Coldwater Canyon TH starts in the East side of the parking lot.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 This area was apart of the C.C.C.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 You'll cross a few bridges. The trail for the first mile or so has a pretty moderate elevation gain. The trail is really shaded, but because of the steepness you'll still sweat.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 Eventually the trail turns West, and you will start to have amazing views of the surrounding peaks.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
Wow, what a view! You can't quite see Mt. Ogden, but it's above this area.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
A rare family photo!
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
Crossing one of the many avalanche slide paths. I would avoid this trail in winter due to to all the avi danger. If you still feel like you want to hike this in winter, be sure to check current conditions on the Utah Avalance Center website.

Can't get enough of the view!
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
It was getting pretty hot, so the dogs found some shade in this old cabin, at roughly 1.8 miles. Copper is one of our good buddies!
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
This trail has some sheer drop offs with a narrow trail.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
We found several nice overlooks to stop at along the way. 
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 Byron leads the way, and we finally start to hike downhill.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 Great view down to the Ogden Canyon Waterfall, and Ogden, UT.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 Stopping at another overlook.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 Eventually the trail leads you down to the BST, and there is no more shade.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
 Follow the signs to get back to the 22nd Street TH, where you should have one car parked.
Hiking the Indian Trail in Ogden
We made it! That was a really pretty and fun hike!


Trail map



Hiking Icebox Canyon via Wheeler Creek, Utah
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8 comments:

  1. How far are the car parks from each other?

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  2. Hi Alicia. Headed to St. George for a couple of days of hiking. Could stop and hike along the way. What are your top hikes down there w or w/o dogs? (Not going to Zion this trip.) Thanks so much for all you share on girl on a hike! Lucinda

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    1. Hey! Check out my post on the Yant Flat Cliffs - sooo pretty! It can get hot though, so start early especially with the dogs. Also, I haven't done it yet but check out Toquerville Falls to let them swim. Have fun! -Alicia

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  3. Howdy there! I love your blog!I've been reading it for quite some time now and love exploring the trails you suggest. I was wondering if you've ever encountered a rattlesnake on your journeys and if you have any suggestions for rattlesnake safety for people and pups a like. I'm worried I'd freeze up and wouldn't know what to do if that happened. If you write a post about snake safety or had any suggestions that would be amazing! Thanks for all your work! You're an amazing writer!
    -Annie and pups Bebe & Truman

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    1. Thanks for the love! Yes, we usually see at least one snake per year. Honestly, the snake is more scared of you and your dog, so they will let you know if you are too close by making a rattling or other hissing noise. Just back away, and try to walk around it by at least 8-10 feet. Give it plenty of space to feel like he's not being intruded. Keep calm, and don't try to touch it or move it. Charlie doesn't usually seem to notice the snakes, I for sure do, but I still grab him by the collar and pull him around the snake with me. Hope this helps! Keep on hiking. -Alicia

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  4. Will do. Thanks for the suggestions!

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  5. Is there cell service at the Coldwater canyon trailhead. I want to Uber back to my car

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