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The Best Moab Arch Hikes Outside of Arches National Park

The Best Moab Arch Hikes Outside of Arches National Park are no more than a 20 minute drive from the park, plus allows dogs, and most are great for kids. These arches listed below are some of the best in the area. Why stick to just Delicate Arch when you can see something unique and off the beaten path? Check out these out to hike to something different in Moab, Utah!

Moab

Hiking to Corona Arch, Moab

Corona Arch is one of Moab's most popular trails and one of the most impressive arches in Southern Utah. From Moab, Corona Arch is closer than that of any arch in Arches National Park, and dogs are allowed (whereas in Arches NP dogs aren't allowed to hike any trails).

Moab

Hiking The Fisher Towers, MoabThe Fisher Towers Trail is located 16 miles North East of Moab, Utah, and offers a 4 mile (RT) hike that winds through these fin-like structures. The Fisher Towers are composed of Moenkopi and Cutler sandstone, and have eroded into many shapes and sizes. These towers are one of the most outstanding scenic features of Utah's Colorado Riverway, as the rock pinnacles soar above a maze of red and pink hued canyon, and overlook the Colorado River, Onion Creek, and the famous rock "Priest & Nuns" to the south.

Moab

Hiking Mary Jane Slot Canyon, Moab

Mary Jane Slot Canyon is one of Moab's hidden gems - the "trail" is a creek the entire way, which leads to a 30 ft waterfall. This is a great trail to do when Moab is too hot, and you, the dogs, or kids need to cool off. The canyon walls get higher as you hike further into the canyon, and eventually will reach upwards of 100 ft! There are several side canyons that allow for exploring tighter slot canyons.

Moab

Lodging at the Geyser Pass Yurt, Backcountry Skiing Geyser Pass

The Geyser Pass Yurt is located in the LaSal Mountains, just outside of Moab, Utah. To reach this yurt requires a 4 mile ski or snowshoe in, following the forest road that is usually drive-able in summer months. It's located right in the pass, just to the SE of Haystack Mountain and to the south of Mt.Tomasaki at 10,500 ft!  While on the Manti-LaSal National Forest land, this is a privately owned yurt by Talking Mountain Yurts (TMY). They have a special permit for their yurt to be on National Forest land.

Moab

Hiking to the Portal Overlook, Moab The Portal Overlook is a great overview looking down to Moab, UT as well as the LaSal Mountains and Colorado River. It's a perfect sunrise hike or good trail when you need something short with a great reward! This isn't a trail you want to do middle of summer - zero shade and water, plus lots of bikers, along with the desert heat will make this miserable and can potentially burn dogs paws. The best time to hike this is in Spring or late Fall when the temps have cooled off. Winter would be okay too, just bring microspikes. While this trail is short, I still carried 2 liters of water for just me and Charlie and we both drank it all. You'll definitely get a workout in as this climbs 800 ft to the overlook.

Moab

Hiking to Mt.Tomasaki, LaSal Mountains Mt.Tomasaki (12,239 ft) is a peak in the LaSal Mountains, and one of seven "12ers" in the range. The LaSal Mountains are the 2nd highest mountain range in Utah, behind the Uinta Mountains. Mt.Tomasaki is accessible by a trail half of the way from the Burro Pass TH, and then the second half is off trail but is easy hiking across the high alpine terrain. The trail itself is mostly exposed, with no water source. Start hiking early in the morning to beat the afternoon thunderstorms that occur almost daily in this mountain range. The best time to summit is Summer and Fall (typically late June to the first snowfall in October). Call the LaSal Ranger to make sure Geyser Pass is open before planning your hike here.

Moab

Hiking to Haystack Mountain, LaSal Mountains

Haystack Mountain (11,641 ft) is a prominent peak in the LaSal Mountain range just outside of Moab, UT. The LaSal Mountains are the 2nd highest mountain range in Utah, behind the Uinta Mountains. Haystack Mountain is accessible by a trail most of the way - the last 1.5 miles is off trail. The trail itself is mostly well-shaded, with plenty of water for dogs to drink from, from the creek that flows year-round. As you reach the saddle, you'll hike above tree line and will be fully exposed. Start hiking early in the morning to beat the afternoon thunderstorms that occur almost daily in this mountain range. The best time to summit is Summer and Fall (typically late June to the first snowfall in October).

Moab

Hiking Grandstaff Canyon to Morning Glory Arch, Dog friendly hikes in moab, hiking in moab with dogs

Grandstaff Canyon (previously known at Negro Bill Canyon prior to 2016) follows a perennial stream, along tall Navajo Sandstone, through an oasis of cottonwood and willow trees. Most people say it's not about the destination, it's the journey getting there that is more rewarding. I beg to differ with this trail. The payoff at the end is the spectacular Morning Glory Arch, which spans 243ft, and is the 6th largest natural bridge in the U.S.! This is one trail the whole family will enjoy. In Summer, bring your water shoes as crossing in the stream will feel refreshing. In Winter, you may want to bring microspikes, since most of the trail is shaded by canyon walls. Beware of monsoon season, as you may just catch a waterfall at the right time (photos below).

Moab

 Moab Flats is Moab, Utah's best downtown lofts! Ok, that is just my opinion, but you definitely need to check this place out if you love exploring Moab, but need something dog-friendly and its just too hot (or cold) to camp. My friend and I love hiking in the LaSals every summer, but as most of you know, summer is the hottest time in Moab with temperatures usually near 100F every day. However, if you escape to the mountains temps are much cooler. My other favorite time to visit Moab is winter when there are no tourists, and the sand won't burn the dogs' paws. But then it's too cold to camp! What's a girl who loves to camp to do?

Moab

Hiking to Brumley Arch, LaSal Mountains, Hiking in Moab with Dogs

Brumley Arch is located in the LaSal Mountains, just outside Moab, Utah. It is only 2 miles round trip, making this a great family-friendly hike that even dogs are allowed to hike to. The trail is very shaded, but has some steep spots, especially to get to the bottom of the creek and to see the arch so it's best for kids over age 6. Brumley Creek runs year round, though water levels may be quite low in late Summer to Fall. 

Moab

Hiking to Mann's Peak, LaSal Mountains, Hiking in Moab, Utah

Mann's Peak (12,272 ft) 5th highest peak in the LaSal Mountains, and one of seven "12ers" in the range. The LaSal Mountains are the 2nd highest mountain range in Utah, behind the Uinta Mountains. Mann's Peak is easily accessible by a trail the entire way from the West at Warner Lake Campground, or coming from the East in Beaver Basin. The trail itself is mostly well-shaded, with plenty of water from the Dry Fork Mill Creek. As you reach the saddle, you'll hike above tree line and will be fully exposed. Start hiking early in the morning to beat the afternoon thunderstorms that occur almost daily in this mountain range. The best time to summit is Summer and Fall (typically late June to the first snowfall in October).

Moab

Hiking 7 Mile Canyon, Moab, Hiking Seven Mile Canyon, Moab, Hiking in Moab with Dogs

7 Mile Canyon (sometimes spelled out, Seven) is located only 11 miles North of Moab, Utah. It's a great, short hike that dogs and kids will enjoy, as it passes by several petroglphys and pictographs. The trail is very easy and flat, so no hard effort is required to get to these artifacts. 7 Mile Canyon is on the way to Dead Horse State Park, but it definitely has a quiet and remote feel. During our hike we only passed one other person. This hike is very sandy, and you'll hike in and out of the dry steam bed. There's very little shade, so be prepared with the necessary items to keep cool, and carry at least 2 liters of water (and water for your pup!). Please keep in mind that touching the artifacts are not allowed.

Moab

Hiking to Mt. Waas, LaSal Mountains, Grand County High Point, Hiking in Utah with Dogs

Mt. Waas (12,331 ft) is the Grand County High Point, and highest peak on the north end of the La Sal Mountains near Moab, Utah. The La Sals can be seen as far away from Green River and parts of Colorado, yet hardly anyone makes the trek to the several summits available, making a great place to seek solitude. The Moab valley can be in the 100s for daily high temperatures in the Summer, yet in the LaSals, it can be at least 20-30F cooler depending on how high you reach. The La Sals area only accessible during summer months when the gates are open, and the roads are dry and clear of snow, typically July - October. Winter of 2017 was extremely dry so we were able to summit late June 2018 with only one patch of snow.

Moab

Hiking the Stair Master Trail, Moab, Hiking in Moab with Dogs

The Stairmaster Trail in Moab, Utah is another short yet very rewarding hike that leads to an amazing overlook of the Moab valley and LaSal Mountains. This hike is only 1 mile to the overlook, yet it gains 820 ft. The Stairmaster Trail parallels the Moab Rim Safari Jeep Route, so you are likely to see many Jeeps or Razors tackling the rock obstacles. This trail can get really hot in summer, so I recommend avoiding it in Summer months if you are hiking with your dogs (the slickrock gets too hot for their paws) OR start really early in the morning to beat the heat.

Moab

Hiking to Funnel Arch, Moab, Hiking in Moab with Dogs, Hiking in Utah with Dogs

Funnel Arch (aka Cable Arch) is a short, yet rewarding hike to a massive arch located only 15 minutes from Moab, UT. Compared to the nearby Corona Arch, you'll likely see any people at this arch since it's not as well know and there's no trail sign. However, this arch is just as good, or even better, than Corona Arch. Getting to Funnel Arch does require one small section of a scramble (class 2), so I advise not bringing dogs or kids. Funnel Arch is a popular area for people to practice rappelling skills (see short video here), if you have the gear and experience.

Moab

Long Bow Arch is located only 15 minutes from Moab, UT and starts at the Poison Spider Mesa area, near the Colorado River. This arch spans at least 100 ft long! This is a great trail if you are short on time but want the best bang for your time since you get a little of everything - petroglyphs, dinosaur tracks, great views of the Colorado River, and at the end, Long Bow Arch. This trail is dog and kid friendly, making it perfect for families. Winter is the best time to hike here, as there are less Jeeps and dirt bikes racing around, plus the temperatures are better for the dogs. Summer can get extremely hot, and the sand can burn dog paws. Some of the best arches are located outside of Arches National Park, so add this one to your list! 

Moab

Looking Glass Rock & Arch, Moab, Arches in Utah, Hiking in Utah with Dogs

Looking Glass Rock & Arch is off HWY 191, about 25 miles south of Moab, UT yet hardly anyone makes the stop to check out this cool spot. This isn't really a "hike" but more of a "walk", since you basically drive right up to it, then walk about 200 yards up to the arch. Yet what this small walk offers is one of the best arches and viewpoints in the area. There are so many cool arches outside of Arches National Park, yet nobody cares to explore them. Best part? Dogs are allowed!

Moab

Jug Handle Arch & Petroglyphs

Jug Handle Arch probably ranks pretty low on the "Arches list" if there is such a thing. However, what this arch lacks in grandeur makes up for itself for a worthy stop to check out the petroglyphs along the south facing cliff wall. Don't expect much from Jug Handle Arch, but if you happen to be on HWY 191 following the Colorado River or hiked either Jeep Arch or Corona Arch it makes for a good extra, quick stop since it's only 3.5 miles past the trail heads.

Moab

Hiking in Hunter Canyon, Moab

Hunter Canyon is located in Kane Creek, in the area called Behind the Rocks in Moab. Hunter Canyon is home to Hunter Arch and a few petroglyphs (if you can find them), and is a great hike for the whole family - dogs and kids, included. This winding canyon is beautiful - tall sandstone cliff walls, pools of water, a flowing stream in spring (it dries out in Summer), shade here and there to cool off, and red rock towers. Hunter Canyon stretches for miles on end, but most people turn around at the 2 mile mark, where the canyon intersects with a fork with another canyon.

Moab

Best Dog Friendly Trails in Moab, Utah

Check out the 7 Best Dog friendly trails in Moab for you and your pack! Moab, Utah is an outdoor mecca, and gateway to several National Parks and Monuments, including Arches & Canyonlands, and Dead Horse Point State Park. Many people think that because these parks aren't dog friendly, that Moab isn't dog friendly. Listen up hikers - Moab is one of THE friendliest dog towns in Utah. All you have to do is hike outside the national parks, and your pup will be in hiking heaven. There are over 20 hikes that are dog friendly and off leash - I've picked out my favorites listed below.

Moab

Hiking to Jeep Arch, Moab

Jeep Arch, located only 15 minutes from Moab, Utah is one of the many amazing arches this area has to offer hikers. Its neighbor, Corona Arch, sees thousands of people a year yet Jeep Arch is a mere 0.3 miles down the same road and sees way less people. From it's name, you'd think it's a stop along the annual Jeep Safari routes, however no motorized vehicles (nor mountain bikes) are allowed on this trail. The arch got its name for the resemblance of a cut out of a cartoonish Jeep built into the natural sandstone.

Moab

Hiking the Hidden Valley Trail, Moab

Hiking the Hidden Valley Trail right outside of Moab makes you feel like you are in a totally different place - look anywhere in Moab and the dominant sight is the Moab rim. It's known as "Behind the Rocks" - an interesting mix of sandstone fins, large rock walls, and domes. Is Hidden Valley really a valley? Not quite.  It's actually two hanging terraces that descends into Behind the Rocks and eventually widens into a 4-wheel drive road while a boot-beaten path detours along the base of a sandstone wall with petroglyphs.

Moab

Hiking the Onion Creek Narrows, Moab

Onion Creek is located off of HWY 128 near the gorgeous Castle Valley and Fisher Towers area - both excellent for hiking and climbing. Onion Creek actually extends for roughly 22 miles, but the best section, the Onion Creek Narrows, lasts for only 1 mile. Because of the short distance, it's a great hike (really more of a walk) for the whole family - dogs will appreciate the cool relief of the creek on a hot summer day.

Moab

Hiking the Amasa Back Trail, Moab, Utah, Hiking in Utah with Dogs, Hiking in Moab with Dogs

The Amasa Back Trail, like many in Utah, is an old road, more popular with mountain bikers, four-wheelers, and motorcyclists than hikers. Most people's attitude is, "Why hike when you can ride?" The easy answer is rather than being preoccupied with a machine, hiking allows you to connect with the earth directly, allows you to look up more often and take in the views, and (for me) more fulfilling than riding.

Moab

Hiking to Mt. Peale & Mt. Tukuhnikivatz, Utah Ultra Prominence Peaks

Mt. Peale (12,721 ft) and Mt. Tukuhnikivatz (12, 482 ft) are two prominent peaks in the LaSal Mountains right outside of Moab, UT. Mt. Peale is the highest point in the range, and 2nd tallest prominent mountain in Utah; Mt. Tukuhnikivatz (pronounced tuk-oon-ik-ah-vatz) is the peak you mainly see from the valley floor from Moab, and is a mountain well known in Edward Abbey's, Desert Solitaire. If you have ever lived in Utah, have passed through, or want to have some sense of what Moab and Arches National Park was like back in the day, reading Desert Solitaire is a must. 

Moab

Faux Falls, Moab

Faux Falls in Moab is a very short walk, that the whole family will enjoy. "Faux" is French for "false" or "fake", hence the name. Faux Falls was built in 1981 along with Ken's Lake, when a drought in the early 1970s pressed for the need of more water for Moab and surrounding areas. Ken's Lake is named for the then District Chairman, Ken McDonald, and the lake was dedicated for irrigation purposes in the upper Spanish Valley - long known as "Poverty Flats" because of its lack of water. It cost $4 million dollars to build the 96 ft high dam to hold an estimated 2,750 acres of water that allows for the cultivation of roughly 900 acres of land.

Moab

Left Fork of Mill Creek, Moab, Hiking in Moab with Dogs

Hiking the North Fork of Mill Creek in Moab has been on my hiking "to do" list every time I'm in town, but it always got put on the back burner for other trails. This time, since we had 5 dogs with us, we made it happen! Us and the dogs had done a dry hike the day before at The Fisher Towers, and really needed to cool off. We all had big dogs, and they tend to overheat quickly. Hiking along a stream seemed like the perfect way to cool off. However, I wasn't looking forward to Charlie riding home 4 hours in the car home soaking wet and sandy. Sometimes you just need to let the dogs have fun and not care about keeping things clean.

Moab

Sand Flats Recreation Area, Camping with dogs in Moab

For Valentine's Day weekend, we wanted to escape the SLC inversion, and get into warm, clean air. Since it's February, and day time highs can be up to 50-55F, we knew most places would be a mud pit from all the snow melting. We also wanted to go somewhere Charlie could be off leash, and where hiking was available. I had been to Sand Flats about two years ago when a bunch of friends and I went jeeping for my birthday. I remembered thinking it would be a cool place to camp. We also knew we'd be arriving after dark, so we needed a place that would have designated campsites. Sand Flats ended up being perfect!

Moab

Slickrock Trail Guide, Slickrock Trail Maps, Slickrock Moab, Sand Flats Recreation Area, Hiking in Utah with Dogs

Slickrock Trail, the world famous mountain biking trail, is located in Moab, Utah. Most people bike this 10.5 mile loop, but we hiked it! Slickrock Trail is located at the Sand Flats Recreation Area, about 10 minutes outside of Moab, where we also camped for two nights. This trail is popular for its scenic, rugged expanse of Navajo Sandstone, the remnant of wind blown sand dunes. Slickrock Trail was established in 1969 for motorcycles, but the trail is now popular for both mountain bikes and motorcycles - it is closed to all four-wheeled vehicles.

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